Publications

Filter by Keyword

Filter by Application

Filter by Product/Solution


Revista brasileira de ortopedia, 53, 293–299
2018

Intra-articular viscosupplementation of hyaluronic acids in an experimental osteoarthritis model.

Oliveira, Marcello Zaia, Albano, Mauro Batista, Stirma, Guilherme Augusto, Namba, Mario Massatomo, Vidigal, Leandro, Cunha, Luiz Antonio Munhoz da

To analyze, from the immunohistochemical perspective, the effects of hyaluronic acid of different molecular weights in an experimental model of osteoarthritis in rabbits. Forty-four male California rabbits were randomly assigned to three different groups (PR, S, and P) and submitted to the resection of the anterior cruciate ligament of the right knee. Three weeks after the surgical procedure, three intra-articular weekly injections were carried out with low-molecular-weight native hyaluronic acid (Hyalgan ) to PR group, high molecular weight branched chain hyaluronic acid (Synvisc ) to group S, and saline solution 0.9% to group P. All animals were sacrificed 12 weeks after the surgical procedure, and the tibial plateaus of the infiltrated knees were then dissected. Histological sections of cartilage from the tibial plateau support areas were stained with immunohistochemical markers in order to investigate the amount of metalloproteases (MMPs 3 and 13) and their inhibitors (TIMPs 1 and 3). The staining intensity was quantified on a Zeiss Imager.Z2 Metasystems microscope and analyzed by Metafer4 Msearch software. The chondroprotective effect of the hyaluronic acids used in the study was demonstrated when compared to the control group. However, the comparison between them presented no significant statistical difference regarding chondroprotection. The injection of saline solution demonstrated signs of OA development, while adding native hyaluronic acid of low molecular weight (Hyalgan ) and hyaluronic acid of high molecular weight (Synvisc ) protected the articular cartilage in this model of OA.

Digital object identifier (DOI): 10.1016/j.rboe.2018.03.009

PloS one, 12, e0178877
2017

Depletion of ATP and glucose in advanced human atherosclerotic plaques.

Ekstrand, Matias, Widell, Emma, Hammar, Anna, Akyürek, Levent M, Johansson, Martin, Fagerberg, Björn, Bergström, Göran, Levin, Malin C, Fogelstrand, Per, Borén, Jan, Levin, Max

Severe hypoxia develops close to the necrotic core of advanced human atherosclerotic plaques, but the energy metabolic consequences of this hypoxia are not known. In animal models, plaque hypoxia is also associated with depletion of glucose and ATP. ATP depletion may impair healing of plaques and promote necrotic core expansion. To investigate if ATP depletion is present in human plaques, we analyzed the distribution of energy metabolites (ATP, glucose, glycogen and lactate) in intermediate and advanced human plaques. Snap frozen carotid endarterectomies from 6 symptomatic patients were analyzed. Each endarterectomy included a large plaque ranging from the common carotid artery (CCA) to the internal carotid artery (ICA). ATP, glucose, and glycogen concentrations were lower in advanced (ICA) compared to intermediate plaques (CCA), whereas lactate concentrations were higher. The lowest concentrations of ATP, glucose and glycogen were detected in the perinecrotic zone of advanced plaques. Our study demonstrates severe ATP depletion and glucose deficiency in the perinecrotic zone of human advanced atherosclerotic plaques. ATP depletion may impair healing of plaques and promote disease progression.

Digital object identifier (DOI): 10.1371/journal.pone.0178877

Sci Rep, 6, 25658
2016

Trafficking of Endogenous Immunoglobulins by Endothelial Cells at the Blood-Brain Barrier.

Villasenor, Roberto, Ozmen, Laurence, Messaddeq, Nadia, Grüninger, Fiona, Loetscher, Hansruedi, Keller, Annika, Betsholtz, Christer, Freskg\aard, Per-Ola, Collin, Ludovic

The Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) restricts access of large molecules to the brain. The low endocytic activity of brain endothelial cells (BECs) is believed to limit delivery of immunoglobulins (IgG) to the brain parenchyma. Here, we report that endogenous mouse IgG are localized within intracellular vesicles at steady state in BECs in vivo. Using high-resolution quantitative microscopy, we found a fraction of endocytosed IgG in lysosomes. We observed that loss of pericytes (key components of the BBB) in pdgf-b(ret/ret) mice affects the intracellular distribution of endogenous mouse IgG in BECs. In these mice, endogenous IgG was not detected within lysosomes but instead accumulate at the basement membrane and brain parenchyma. Such IgG accumulation could be due to reduced lysosomal clearance and increased sorting to the abluminal membrane of BECs. Our results suggest that, in addition to low uptake from circulation, IgG lysosomal degradation may be a downstream mechanism by which BECs further restrict IgG access to the brain.

Digital object identifier (DOI): 10.1038/srep25658

Front Neurol, 7, 23
2016

Lesion Size Is Exacerbated in Hypoxic Rats Whereas Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 Alpha and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Increase in Injured Normoxic Rats: A Prospective Cohort Study of Secondary Hypoxia in Focal Traumatic Brain Injury.

Thelin, Eric Peter, Frostell, Arvid, Mulder, Jan, Mitsios, Nicholas, Damberg, Peter, Aski, Sahar Nikkhou, Risling, M\aarten, Svensson, Mikael, Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina, Bellander, Bo-Michael

Hypoxia following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a severe insult shown to exacerbate the pathophysiology, resulting in worse outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a hypoxic insult in a focal TBI model by monitoring brain edema, lesion volume, serum biomarker levels, immune cell infiltration, as well as the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).Female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 73, including sham and naive) were used. The rats were intubated and mechanically ventilated. A controlled cortical impact device created a 3-mm deep lesion in the right parietal hemisphere. Post-injury, rats inhaled either normoxic (22\% O2) or hypoxic (11\% O2) mixtures for 30 min. The rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days post-injury. Serum was collected for S100B measurements using ELISA. Ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to determine lesion size and edema volume. Immunofluorescence was employed to analyze neuronal death, changes in cerebral macrophage- and neutrophil infiltration, microglia proliferation, apoptosis, complement activation (C5b9), IgG extravasation, HIF-1α, and VEGF.The hypoxic group had significantly increased blood levels of lactate and decreased pO2 (p < 0.0001). On MRI post-traumatic hypoxia resulted in larger lesion areas (p = 0.0173), and NeuN staining revealed greater neuronal loss (p = 0.0253). HIF-1α and VEGF expression was significantly increased in normoxic but not in hypoxic animals (p < 0.05). A trend was seen for serum levels of S100B to be higher in the hypoxic group at 1 day after trauma (p = 0.0868). No differences were observed between the groups in cytotoxic and vascular edema, IgG extravasation, neutrophils and macrophage aggregation, microglia proliferation, or C5b-9 expression.Hypoxia following focal TBI exacerbated the lesion size and neuronal loss. Moreover, there was a tendency to higher levels of S100B in the hypoxic group early after injury, indicating a potential validity as a biomarker of injury severity. In the normoxic group, the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF was found elevated, possibly indicative of neuro-protective responses occurring in this less severely injured group. Further studies are warranted to better define the pathophysiology of post-TBI hypoxia.

Digital object identifier (DOI): 10.3389/fneur.2016.00023

Stroke, 46(3), 835–842
March, 2015

Imaging of a clinically relevant stroke model: glucose hypermetabolismrevisited.

Fabian Arnberg, Jonas Grafstroem, Johan Lundberg, Sahar Nikkhou-Aski, Philip Little, Peter Damberg, Nicholas Mitsios, Jan Mulder, Li Lu, Michael Soederman, Sharon Stone-Elander, Staffan Holmin

Ischemic stroke has been shown to cause hypermetabolism of glucose in the ischemic penumbra. Experimental and clinical data indicate that infarct-related systemic hyperglycemia is a potential therapeutic target in acute stroke. However, clinical studies aiming for glucose control in acute stroke have neither improved functional outcome nor reduced mortality. Thus, further studies on glucose metabolism in the ischemic brain are warranted.We used a rat model of stroke that preserves collateral flow. The animals were analyzed by [2-(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance imaging during 90-minute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and during 60 minutes after reperfusion. Results were correlated to magnetic resonance imaging of cerebral blood flow, diffusion of water, lactate formation, and histological data on cell death and blood-brain barrier breakdown.We detected an increased [2-(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose uptake within ischemic regions succumbing to infarction and in the peri-infarct region. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed impairment of blood flow to ischemic levels in the infarct and a reduction of cerebral blood flow in the peri-infarct region. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed lactate in the ischemic region and absence of lactate in the peri-infarct region. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed apoptosis and blood-brain barrier breakdown within the infarct.The increased uptake of [2-(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose in cerebral ischemia most likely reflects hypermetabolism of glucose meeting increased energy needs of ischemic and hypoperfused brain tissue, and it occurs under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions measured by local lactate production. Infarct-related systemic hyperglycemia could serve to facilitate glucose supply to the ischemic brain. Glycemic control by insulin treatment could negatively influence this mechanism.

Acta Neuropathol
February, 2015

Critical role of somatostatin receptor 2 in the vulnerability ofthe central noradrenergic system: new aspects on Alzheimer's disease.

Csaba Adori, Laura Glueck, Swapnali Barde, Takashi Yoshitake, Gabor G. Kovacs, Jan Mulder, Zsofia Magloczky, Laszlo Havas, Kata Boelcskei, Nicholas Mitsios, Mathias Uhlen, Janos Szolcsanyi, Jan Kehr, Annica Roennbaeck, Thue Schwartz, Jens F. Rehfeld, Tibor Harkany, Miklos Palkovits, Stefan Schulz, Tomas Hoekfelt

Alzheimer's disease and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders are associated with deterioration of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), a probable trigger for mood and memory dysfunction. LC noradrenergic neurons exhibit particularly high levels of somatostatin binding sites. This is noteworthy since cortical and hypothalamic somatostatin content is reduced in neurodegenerative pathologies. Yet a possible role of a somatostatin signal deficit in the maintenance of noradrenergic projections remains unknown. Here, we deployed tissue microarrays, immunohistochemistry, quantitative morphometry and mRNA profiling in a cohort of Alzheimer's and age-matched control brains in combination with genetic models of somatostatin receptor deficiency to establish causality between defunct somatostatin signalling and noradrenergic neurodegeneration. In Alzheimer's disease, we found significantly reduced somatostatin protein expression in the temporal cortex, with aberrant clustering and bulging of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive afferents. As such, somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) mRNA was highly expressed in the human LC, with its levels significantly decreasing from Braak stages III/IV and onwards, i.e., a process preceding advanced Alzheimer's pathology. The loss of SSTR2 transcripts in the LC neurons appeared selective, since tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine â-hydroxylase, galanin or galanin receptor 3 mRNAs remained unchanged. We modeled these pathogenic changes in Sstr2 (-/-) mice and, unlike in Sstr1 (-/-) or Sstr4 (-/-) genotypes, they showed selective, global and progressive degeneration of their central noradrenergic projections. However, neuronal perikarya in the LC were found intact until late adulthood (

Revista brasileira de ortopedia, 49, 62–68
2014

Effect of hyaluronic acids as chondroprotective in experimental model of osteoarthrosis.

Oliveira, Marcello Zaia, Albano, Mauro Batista, Namba, Mario Massatomo, da Cunha, Luiz Antônio Munhoz, de Lima Gonçalves, Renan Rodrigues, Trindade, Edvaldo Silva, Andrade, Lucas Ferrari, Vidigal, Leandro

<p>To analyze the effects of hyaluronic acid of different molecular weights in an experimental model of osteoarthritis in rabbits. forty-four male California rabbits were divided randomly into three groups and underwent resection of the anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee. After three weeks of the surgical procedure began three weekly intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid native (Polireumin®)-PR, hyaluronic acid branched chain (Synvisc®)-S and 0.9% saline-P. All animals were sacrificed after twelve weeks of surgery and tibial plateau infiltrated the knees were dissected. Histological cartilage of the support areas of the tibial plateaus were stained with Alcian Blue pH 1.0, Alcian Blue pH = 2.5 and toluidine blue for research on the amount of proteoglycans. The intensity of staining was quantified on a Zeiss microscope apparatus Imager Z2 MetaSystems and analyzed by software MetaferMsearch. the effect of chondroprotetor hyaluronic acids used in the study was confirmed when compared to the control group, but the comparison made between them, there was no statistically significant difference regarding chondroprotetion. The hyaluronic acids tested had chondroprotective effect, with no statistical difference with regard to the different molecular weights.</p>

Digital object identifier (DOI): 10.1016/j.rboe.2014.01.007

Modern Pathology, 402-411
2014

Multiple genetic alterations in primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma, leg type support a common lymphomagenesis with activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

Anne Pham-Ledard, Martina Prochazkova-Carlotti, Laetitia Andrique, David Cappellen, Béatrice Vergier, Fabian Martinez, Florent Grange, Tony Petrella, Marie Beylot-Barry, Jean-Philippe Merlio

<p>Primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma, leg type has been individualized from nodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The objective of this study was to screen primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma, leg type for genetic alterations recently described in nodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Skin biopsies from 23 patients were analyzed for IRF4, BCL2, BCL6, and MYC expression. FISH testing was performed for BCL2, BCL6, MYC with separation probes and for CDKN2A and PRDM1/BLIMP1 deletion. Multiple sequential FISH analyses with up to six probes were performed to define samples with multiple cytogenetic alterations. MYD88 mutations were studied by Sanger sequencing. All cases but one displayed at least one genetic alteration (96%). Nine patients exhibited a single genetic mutation and 12 combined several alterations (52%). We observed a split for BCL2, BCL6, or MYC in 1/23, 6/23, and 3/23 of cases, respectively. No double-hit lymphoma was observed. CDKN2A deletion was detected by FISH in only 5/23 cases. BLIMP1 and/or 6q deletion was observed at a higher rate in 10/20 of cases. No correlation between rearrangement and immunohistochemical expression was found for BCL2 or MYC. FISH tracking of sequential hybridizations showed that several alterations were carried by the same nuclei. The p.L265P MYD88 mutation was found in 11/18 (61%) of cases. Contrary to most cutaneous lymphomas that rarely harbor primary genetic alteration of their nodal histological equivalent, primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma, leg type seems to be a 'cutaneous counterpart' of activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with a similar cytogenetic profile and a high rate of MYD88 oncogenic L265P mutation. This also suggests a common lymphomagenesis with NF-jB activation, strong IRF4 expression and terminal B-cell differentiation blockage. Our data support the use of therapies targeting NF-jB, as most patients displayed disease progression and resistance to conventional therapies.</p>

Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol, 304(8), R675–R682
April, 2013

Renal sensory and sympathetic nerves reinnervate the kidney in asimilar time-dependent fashion after renal denervation in rats.

Jan Mulder, Tomas Hökfelt, Mark M. Knuepfer, Ulla C. Kopp

Efferent renal sympathetic nerves reinnervate the kidney after renal denervation in animals and humans. Therefore, the long-term reduction in arterial pressure following renal denervation in drug-resistant hypertensive patients has been attributed to lack of afferent renal sensory reinnervation. However, afferent sensory reinnervation of any organ, including the kidney, is an understudied question. Therefore, we analyzed the time course of sympathetic and sensory reinnervation at multiple time points (1, 4, and 5 days and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, and 12 wk) after renal denervation in normal Sprague-Dawley rats. Sympathetic and sensory innervation in the innervated and contralateral denervated kidney was determined as optical density (ImageJ) of the sympathetic and sensory nerves identified by immunohistochemistry using antibodies against markers for sympathetic nerves [neuropeptide Y (NPY) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)] and sensory nerves [substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)]. In denervated kidneys, the optical density of NPY-immunoreactive (ir) fibers in the renal cortex and substance P-ir fibers in the pelvic wall was 6, 39, and 100\% and 8, 47, and 100\%, respectively, of that in the contralateral innervated kidney at 4 days, 4 wk, and 12 wk after denervation. Linear regression analysis of the optical density of the ratio of the denervated/innervated kidney versus time yielded similar intercept and slope values for NPY-ir, TH-ir, substance P-ir, and CGRP-ir fibers (all R(2) > 0.76). In conclusion, in normotensive rats, reinnervation of the renal sensory nerves occurs over the same time course as reinnervation of the renal sympathetic nerves, both being complete at 9 to 12 wk following renal denervation.

Hum Pathol, 43(9), 1363–1375
September, 2012

Utilization of fluorescence in situ hybridization with cytokeratindiscriminators in TOP2A assessment of chemotherapy-treated patientswith breast cancer.

William E. Pierceall, Kam M. Sprott, Tuomas Heikkinen, Paivi Heikkila, Lakshmi Alaparthi, Kristiina Aittomaki, Mohammed Al-Adhami, Vivian Villegas-Bergazzi, Jane L. Meyer, Jeffery L. Kutok, Jirina Bartkova, Jiri Bartek, Heli Nevanlinna, David T. Weaver, Carl Blomqvist

Tumor biomarkers increasingly provide information for predicting outcomes with chemotherapeutic regimens (personalized medicine). Topo2A is a DNA helicase targeted by anthracyclines, cytotoxic therapeutics used in both adjuvant and palliative treatments of breast cancer. TOP2A gene amplification/deletion is implicated in response to anthracycline-based chemotherapy. We describe an approach for analyzing formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast tumors on tissue microarrays with TOP2A fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with cytokeratin immunofluorescence to target tumor cells. Stained tissue from patient specimens was imaged and analyzed using Metafer/Metacyte (Metasystems, Waltham, MA, USA), including customized image classifiers. TOP2A/CEN17 ratios of 2.0 or greater (amplified) and 0.8 or less (deleted) were observed for 10.0\% and 6.1\% of the patients, respectively. Patient outcomes for adjuvant chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide-epirubicin-fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide-methotrexate-fluorouracil, no chemotherapy) were evaluated. No statistical significance was achieved for clinical end points regarding TOP2A status in anthracycline-treated patients. However, patients with TOP2A aberrations receiving methotrexate-based therapy exhibited a significant decrease in 5-year distant disease-free survival and breast cancer-specific overall survival, especially for patients with TOP2A deletions (disease-free survival: hazard ratio, 5.31 [P = .001], and breast cancer-specific overall survival: hazard ratio, 6.45 [P ? .001]). No significant differences were seen in patients included in the no-chemotherapy group. Topo2A protein levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry with no correlative statistical relevance to immunofluorescence/fluorescence in situ hybridization-based prognosis for cyclophosphamide-epirubicin-fluorouracil or cyclophosphamide-methotrexate-fluorouracil groups. Interestingly, aberrant (under)expressing patients in the no-chemotherapy group exhibited better 5-year distant disease-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.39; P = .004), trending toward more favorable breast cancer-specific overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.61; P = .11). Our results indicate a strategy by which fluorescence in situ hybridization scoring targeted to cytokeratin-positive tumor cells may provide a tool for added precision and efficiency in TOP2A evaluation from tumor tissue.

Digital object identifier (DOI): 10.1016/j.humpath.2011.08.018

Anal Cell Pathol (Amst), 33(2), 105–112
2010

Automated analysis of protein expression and gene amplification withinthe same cells of paraffin-embedded tumour tissue.

Timo Gaiser, Lissa Berroa-Garcia, Ralf Kemmerling, Aparajita Dutta, Thomas Ried, Kerstin Heselmeyer-Haddad

<p>The simultaneous detection of protein expression and gene copy number changes in patient samples, like paraffin-embedded tissue sections, is challenging since the procedures of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) negatively influence each other which often results in suboptimal staining. Therefore, we developed a novel automated algorithm based on relocation which allows subsequent detection of protein content and gene copy number changes within the same cell. Paraffin-embedded tissue sections of colorectal cancers were stained for CD133 expression. IHC images were acquired and image coordinates recorded. Slides were subsequently hybridized with fluorescently labeled DNA probes. FISH images were taken at the previously recorded positions allowing for direct comparison of protein expression and gene copy number signals within the same cells/tissue areas. Relocation, acquisition of the IHC and FISH images, and enumeration of FISH signals in the immunophenotyped tumour areas were done in an automated fashion. Automated FISH analysis was performed on 13 different colon cancer samples that had been stained for CD133; each sample was scored for MYC, ZNF217 and Chromosome 6 in CD133 positive and negative glands. From the 13 cases four (31%) showed amplification for the MYC oncogene and seven of 13 (54%) cases were amplified for ZNF217. There was no significant difference between CD133 positive tumour and CD133 negative tumour cells. The technique and algorithm presented here enables an easy and reproducible combination of IHC and FISH based on a novel automated algorithm using relocation and automated spot counting.</p>

Cancer Manag Res, 2, 213–218
2010

Positive response to neoadjuvant cyclophosphamide and doxorubicinin topoisomerase II nonamplified/HER2/neu negative/polysomy 17 absentbreast cancer patients.

Henry G Kaplan, Judith A Malmgren, Mary Atwood, Lynn C Goldstein

<p>Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)/neu, topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A), and polysomy 17 may predict tumor responsiveness to doxorubicin (DOX) therapy.We identified neoadjuvant DOX/cyclophosphamide treated breast cancer patients in our registry from 1997 to 2008 with sufficient tissue for testing (n = 34). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing was done on deparaffinized tissue sections pretreated using vendor's standard protocol modification, and incubated with US Food and Drug Administration approved Abbott Diagnostics Vysis PathVysion™ probe set, including Spectrum-Green-conjugated probe to a-satellite DNA located at the centromere of chromosome 17 (17p11.1-q11.1) and a Spectrum-Orange-conjugated probe to the TOP2A gene. Morphometric analysis was performed using a MetaSystems image analysis system. Manual counting was performed on all samples in which autofluorescence and/or artifact prevented the counting of sufficient numbers of cells. A ratio &gt;2.0 was considered positive for TOP2A amplification. Polysomy 17 (PS17) presence was defined as signals of ≥2.5. Outcomes were pathological complete response (pCR), partial response (PR), and nonresponse (NR). Of 34 patients tested, one was TOP2A amplified (hormone receptor negative/HER2 negative, partial responder). The subset of TOP2A nonamplified, HER2 negative, and PS17 absent (n = 23) patients had treatment response: pCR = 2 (9%), PR = 14 (61%), and NR = 7 (30%). Including the two PS17 present and HER2-positive patients (n = 33), 76% of TOP2A nonamplified patients had pCR or PR. We observed substantial treatment response in patients lacking three postulated predictors that would be difficult to attribute to cyclophosphamide alone. Patients who are HER2 negative and lack TOP2A amplification and PS17 should not be excluded from receiving DOX-containing regimens.</p>

Cytometry, 73, 651- 657
2008

Automated FISH analysis using dual-fusion and break-apart probes on paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

D. Alpár, J. Hermesz, L. Pótó, R. László, L. Kereskai, P. Jáksó, G. Pajor, L. Pajor, B. Kajtár

Detecting balanced translocations using tissue sections plays an important diagnostic role in cases of hematological malignancies. Manual scoring is often problematic due to truncation and overlapping of nuclei. Reports have described automated analysis using primarily tile sampling. The aim of this study was to investigate an automated fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis method using grid sampling on tissue sections, and compare the performance of dual-fusion (DF) and break-apart (BA) probes in this setting. Ten follicular, 10 mantle cell lymphoma, and 10 translocation-negative samples were used to set the threshold of false positivity using IGH/CCND1, IGH/BCL-2 DF, and IGH BA probes. The cut-off distances of red and green signals to define fusion signals were 0.5, 1.0, and 1.2 mum for the IGH/CCND1, IGH/BCL-2 DF, and IGH BA probes, respectively. The mean false positivity of grid units was 5.3, 11.4, and 28.1%, respectively. Ten to 14 additional samples analyzed blindly and were correctly classified using each probe. Discriminating positive and negative samples using automated analysis and grid sampling was possible with each probe, although different definitions of fusion signals were required due to the different physical distances between the DNA probes. Using the DF probes resulted in lower false positivity, which was less affected by signal numbers per grid units.

Diagn Pathol, 3, 0- 0
2008

Development of automated brightfield double In Situ hybridization (BDISH) application for HER2 gene and chromosome 17 centromere (CEN 17) for breast carcinomas and an assay performance comparison to manual dual color HER2 fluorescence In Situ hybridizatio

H. Nitta, B. Hauss-Wegrzyniak, M. Lehrkamp, A.E. Murillo, F. Gaire, M. Farrell, E. Walk, F. Penault-Llorca, M. Kurosumi, M. Dietel, L. Wang, M. Loftus, J. Pettay, R.R. Tubbs, T.M. Grogan

BACKGROUND: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a quantitative assay for selecting breast cancer patients for trastuzumab therapy. However, current HER2 FISH procedures are labor intensive, manual methods that require skilled technologists and specialized fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, FISH slides cannot be archived for long term storage and review. Our objective was to develop an automated brightfield double in situ hybridization (BDISH) application for HER2 gene and chromosome 17 centromere (CEN 17) and test the assay performance with dual color HER2 FISH evaluated breast carcinomas. METHODS: The BDISH assay was developed with the nick translated dinitrophenyl (DNP)-labeled HER2 DNA probe and DNP-labeled CEN 17 oligoprobe on the Ventana BenchMark(R) XT slide processing system. Detection of HER2 and CEN 17 signals was accomplished with the silver acetate, hydroquinone, and H2O2 reaction with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and the fast red and naphthol phosphate reaction with alkaline phosphatase (AP), respectively. The BDISH specificity was optimized with formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded xenograft tumors, MCF7 (non-amplified HER2 gene) and BT-474 (amplified HER2 gene). Then, the BDISH performance was evaluated with 94 routinely processed breast cancer tissues. Interpretation of HER2 and CEN 17 BDISH slides was conducted by 4 observers using a conventional brightfield microscope without oil immersion objectives. RESULTS: Sequential hybridization and signal detection for HER2 and CEN 17 ISH demonstrated both DNA targets in the same cells. HER2 signals were visualized as discrete black metallic silver dots while CEN 17 signals were detected as slightly larger red dots. Our study demonstrated a high consensus concordance between HER2 FISH and BDISH results of clinical breast carcinoma cases based on the historical scoring method (98.9%, Simple Kappa = 0.9736, 95% CI = 0.9222 - 1.0000) and the ASCO/CAP scoring method with the FISH equivocal cases (95.7%, Simple Kappa = 0.8993%, 95% CI = 0.8068 - 0.9919) and without the FISH equivocal cases (100%, Simple Kappa = 1.0000%, 95% CI = 1.0000 - 1.0000). CONCLUSION: Automated BDISH applications for HER2 and CEN 17 targets were successfully developed and it might be able to replace manual two-color HER2 FISH methods. The application also has the potential to be used for other gene targets. The use of BDISH technology allows the simultaneous analyses of two DNA targets within the context of tissue morphological observation.

Modern Pathology, 19, 1027- 1033
2006

Automated analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridization on fixed, paraffin-embedded whole tissue sections in B-cell lymphoma.

K.K. Reichard, B.K. Hall, A. Corn, M.K. Foucar, J. Hozier

Certain recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities are diagnostic of a specific neoplasm and may portend prognosis. As conventional cytogenetics may not reveal a neoplastic clone, and unfixed material for fluorescence in situ hybridization may be unavailable, performing fluorescence in situ hybridization on fixed tissues is diagnostically and prognostically valuable. Manual interpretation of fluorescence in situ hybridization signals may be difficult on paraffin-embedded tissue sections due to truncated nuclei. Therefore, we investigated the use of an automated image acquisition and analysis system (MetaSystems) for interpretation of fluorescence in situ hybridization signals in tissue sections from dual fusion translocation probes. Three probe sets were analyzed on archival specimens with a confirmed diagnosis of mantle cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma. 100% of mantle cell lymphomas (7/7) were positive for t(11;14), 91% of follicular lymphomas (10/11) for t(14;18) and 100% of Burkitt lymphomas (9/9) for t(8;14). Successful hybridization was achieved using various tissue fixatives and fluorescence in situ hybridization interpretation was blinded with respect to the underlying diagnosis. Based on these results, automated analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridization on fixed tissues is accurate and valuable in the evaluation of B-cell lymphoma, and may provide pertinent diagnostic and prognostic information.

BJU International, 95, 1219- 1225
2005

Quantitative molecular urinary cytology by fluorescence in situ hybridization: a tool for tailoring surveillance of patients with superficial bladder cancer?

M. Bollmann, H. Heller, A. Bánkfalvi, H. Griefingholt, R. Bollmann

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether it is possible to stratify patients with superficial bladder cancer into low- and high-risk groups for tumour recurrence/progression based on the chromosomal pattern detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in one urine cytology specimen used for follow-up testing. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Voided urine samples from 47 consecutive patients with urinary tract neoplasms (13 with no history of urothelial malignancy and 34 under follow-up after complete transurethral resection of superficial urothelial carcinoma of the bladder) were evaluated by liquid-based cytology (ThinPrep(R), CYTYC Corp., Boxborough, MA, USA) and UroVysion FISH (Vysis-Abbott, Downers Grove, IL). RESULTS: Of the 34 patients under surveillance, the UroVysion test was negative in four, 17 had loss of 9p21 sequences either alone or combined with low-frequency trisomy/ies or tetrasomy/ies of chromosomes 3, 7 and 17 in single cells (low-risk FISH), and 13 also had complex aneusomies of the remaining chromosomes (high-risk FISH). One of the four FISH-negative neoplasms, four of the 17 low-risk FISH cases and five of the 11 informative high-risk FISH-positive patients developed recurrence. Progression occurred only in patients with high-risk FISH results, showing high-frequency complex chromosomal polysomies (four of 11). CONCLUSION: The results from this pilot study indicate that the UroVysion FISH test may help to individually assess the clinical behaviour of superficial bladder cancer, based on the chromosomal pattern of exfoliated tumour cells in follow-up urinary cytology. It might be of use to identify those patients likely to progress at earlier and curable stages of disease, and lengthen the surveillance period in those with persistent or recurrent low-risk disease.

Cellular Oncology, 26, 335- 345
2004

DNA ploidy and chromosome (FISH) pattern analysis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors

A. Hruska, R. Bollmann, R.B. Kovács, M. Bollmann, M. Bodó, Z. Sápi

BACKGROUND AND METHODS: 44 peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) (27 schwannomas, 9 neurofibromas and 8 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST)) were analyzed to determine DNA ploidy pattern and to clarify the conflicting data in the literature concerning this topic (whether benign PNSTs are aneuploid or not). For further insight we analyzed 6 schwannomas, one atypical neurofibroma and five MPNSTs by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique using centromeric chromosome probes (7, 17 and 18) and automatic image analysis station, Metafer 4. RESULTS: Benign schwannomas (including the problematic variants as ancient, cellular, neuroblastoma like and multiplex schwannomas) could be characterized by euploid-polyploidisation and by their 4c peak height value which was usually more than 10% of total cell number measured. These characters were not found among neurofibromas and MPNST-s. FISH analysis revealed and confirmed that the 'normal' euploid-polyploid cells are mainly eusomic-polysomic containing two, four, eight or sixteen signals for each chromosomes examined, but in a small proportion aneusomy was found among tumor cells of benign schwannomas (average: 2.58; range 1.33-3.44). In contrast, the atypical neurofibroma displayed marked aneusomy (18.44%) but it contained normal eusomic and polysomic cells too. Two diploid MPNSTs proved to be clearly aneusomic with trisomy of chromosome 17 and monosomy of chromosome 18. CONCLUSIONS: All these data suggest that ploidy pattern determination combined with FISH analysis may be a very useful supplementary tool for making a right diagnosis (to differentiate benign versus malignant schwannomas in problematic variants) and to understand better the malignant transformation in PNSTs.

Int J Oncol, 24, 1279- 1288
2004

Molecular characterizations of derivatives of HCT116 colorectal cancer cells that are resistant to the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil.

P.M. De Angelis, B. Fjell, K.L. Kravik, T. Haug, S.H. Tunheim, W. Reichelt, M. Beigi, O.P. Clausen, E. Galteland, T. Stokke

5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the chemotherapeutic drug of choice for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer, but resistance to 5-FU remains a major obstacle to successful therapy. We generated 5-FU-resistant derivatives of the HCT116 human colon cancer cell line by serial passage of these cells in the presence of increasing 5-FU concentrations in an attempt to elucidate the biological mechanisms involved in resistance to 5-FU. Two resultant resistant derivatives, HCT116 ResB and ResD, were characterized for resistance phenotypes, genotypes, and gene expression using cells maintained long-term in 5-FU-free media. Compared to parental HCT116 cells that respond to 5-FU challenge by inducing high levels of apoptosis, ResB and ResD derivatives had significantly reduced apoptotic fractions when transiently challenged with 5-FU. ResB and ResD cells were respectively 27- and 121-fold more resistant to 5-FU, had increased doubling times, and significantly increased plating efficiencies compared to the parental cells. Both resistant derivatives retained the wild-type TP53 genotype, TP53 copy number and CGH profile characteristic of the parental line. Alterations in gene expression in the resistant derivatives compared to the parental line were assessed using oligonucleotide microarrays. Overall, the 5-FU-resistant derivatives were characterized by reduced apoptosis and a more aggressive growth phenotype, consistent with the observed up-regulation of apoptosis-inhibitory genes (e.g., IRAK1, MALT1, BIRC5), positive growth-regulatory genes (e.g., CCND3, CCNE2, CCNF, CYR61), and metastasis genes (e.g., LMNB1, F3, TMSNB), and down-regulation of apoptosis-promoting genes (e.g., BNIP3, BNIP3L, FOXO3A) and negative growth-regulatory genes (e.g., AREG, CCNG2, CDKN1A, CDKN1C, GADD45A). 5-FU metabolism-associated genes (e.g., TYMS, DTYMK, UP) and DNA repair genes (e.g., FEN1, FANCG, RAD23B) were also up-regulated in one or both resistant derivatives, suggesting that the resistant derivatives might be able to overcome both 5-FU inhibition of thymidylate synthase and the DNA damage caused by 5-FU, respectively. Development of 5-FU resistance thus appears to encompass deregulation of apoptosis-, proliferation-, DNA repair-, and metastasis-associated regulatory pathways.